Crochet Bottle Covers

Do you like to take a bottle to a party or give it as gift for Christmas or birthdays ? Why not give one with a difference with these rustic crochet bottle covers. Made from garden twine, they won’t break the bank and are something that the recipient can pass on when the bottle is empty.

They are made using a 6mm hook, so you can whip them up in no time.

You’ll never worry about turning up empty handed again!

Here’s what you need

  • Jute (garden twine)
  • Scissors
  • Crochet hook – we used a 6mm
  • Big eye darning needle

Firstly, a quick note about jute

There are different quality ones in the shops and we have tried and tested most. In our opinion, the only real difference in the cheaper ones is it tends to be lumpier and not as refined. But, it does give a more rustic look, so it really comes down to personal preference. It can also be a little bit harder on the hands, trying to work the thicker bits that appear along the yarn. But, if you slacken the tension slightly its fine
In this tutorial, we used the cheaper twine and a 6mm hook. The size of your hook will depend on your tension. Work the base and see if it fits your bottle. You may need to go up or down a hook size, (up a hook if the base is too small and down a hook size if the base is too big)
If you are new to working with this medium, then start with a slightly bigger hook. If the tension is too loose for you, work down hook sizes until you find one that you are comfortable with and like the effect it achieves.

Abbreviations 

  • st = stitch
  • yo = yarn over
  • ch = chain (yo, pull through)
  • sl st = slip stitch (insert hook, yo, pull through both loops)
  • htr =  (yo, insert hook, yo pull through, yo pull through all 3 loops
  • tr = treble (yo, insert hook, yo pull through, yo pull through 2 loops, yo pull through both loops

Here’s what you do

The cover is worked from the base upwards.

Start with a magic ring and chain 2 (this counts as your first htr).

Don’t worry if you haven’t masted the magic ring yet. work a 4 or 5 chain and slip stitch into the 1st chain (the one furthest from the hook), Chain 2 as you would with the magic ring to create your 1st htr of the round.

Work a further 11 htr into the magic ring or chains (depending which start you did) Total 12sts

 

Join with a sl st into the 2nd (top) chain of the 2 chain worked at the begininng of the round. (12sts)

For the next round, work a 3ch (counts as the 1st treble of the round). Work a 2nd treble into the same space the 3 chain was worked from. 2 tr into each of the remaining 11 stitches from the first round. You will have worked a total of 24 sts in this round. Close the round with a sl st into the 3rd chain (top) of the 3 chain worked at the beginning.

That’s the base of the cover completed.

Place the bottom of the cover under the bottle to see if it fits.

The edge of the cover needs to peep out slightly from underneath. If it’s too big, try working htr’s in round two rather than going down a hook size.  If it’s too small, but you like working with the hook you have chosen, try working rounds 1 & 2 in trebles. This part is a bit of trial and error. Once you have got the size you require, it’s a good idea to jot down what hook and stitch you used for future reference.

For the remainder of the cover we will keep 24 sts in each round. This makes the cover go upwards to form the shape of the bottle. Work a 2 chain (this counts as the 1st htr of the round).

The previous round had a total of 24 sts and we need to work a stitch in each of these. You have already worked 1 htr by chaining 2 at the beginning of the round. Work a further 23 htr’s, 1 in each of the remaining stitches from the previous round. Work in the back loops only for this round. This will give the bottom a better shape to it.

To close the round, sl st into the 2nd (top) chain in the 2 chain worked at the beginning. Total (24sts) You will see that the sides are already forming.

For the next round, we will create the fan pattern that will be repeated up the sides.

Work a 3 chain. This will count as the 1st treble of the round. Each fan is made up of 4 trebles into the same space.

Our 3 chain counts as the 1st treble, so work another 3 tr into the space where the 3 chain was started.

To allow for the width of the fan, skip the next 3 stitches of the round. Working in the 4th stitch from the fan, 4tr into the same space.

Continue the sequence of skipping 3 stitches and working 4 tr into the 4th stitch from the last fan worked. When you have worked 6 fans, you will be left with 3 stitches.  To close the round work a sl st into the 3rd (top) chain of the 3 chain worked at the beginning.

The next round is worked in exactly the same way but we need to get to the right place to begin.

Slip stitch along to the middle space of the 1st fan from the previous round.

3ch (counts as the 1st treble), and work a further 3 trebles into the same space. Continue round working 4 trebles in the centre space of each fan from the previous round.

To close the round, work a sl st in the 3rd (top) chain of the 3 chain worked at the begininng.

Continue working this way, remembering to sl st across to the centre of the first fan of the previous round to start each round.

Work a few rounds and place the bottle in to check the height of the cover. It needs to reach the wide part of the bottle, just before the neck narrows.

When your cover is the desired height, work a round for the ribbon to be threaded through. Sl st 1 to the left to start this round and then worked a 3ch (counts as the 1st treble of the round) Work around this round with 1 tr into each of the stitches from the previous round.

Make sure you work in the stitches (there will be 4 in each fan). Do not work in the space between the fans.

To close the round work a sl st in the 3rd (top) chain of the 3 chain worked at the beginning.

 

To finish the cover, work a round of decorative fans.  3ch (counts as 1st treble of round), then work 4 more tr into the same space the 3ch started from. (5 trebles make up each fan in this round)

To secure the fan in place, miss one stitch and sl st into the next.

Miss one stitch, then 5 tr into next to create the next fan. Then miss one, sl st in next to secure the fan, miss one, 5 tr into next to make the fan, miss one, sl st into next to secure the fan. Continue this sequence finishing with a fan.

To close the round, work a sl st at the bottom right side of the 1st fan.

 

Break off yarn and pull through.

Secure and weave in ends using a wool darning needle. Secure the end in the bottom of the cover too and your cover is now ready for the ribbon.

Thread the ribbon through the treble round, behind one treble, in front of the next, behind, in front, and so on until you get back to the beginning.

Make sure you leave enough length to be able to tie a nice bow.

Insert your bottle and tie the ribbon. Cut a v shape at the end of each ribbon tail for a professional finish.

You may be able to find different coloured twine. We found green at our local garden centre. Look how they turn a boring bottle into a beautiful gift and they great thing is, they can be used time and time again.

So next time you’re at your local DIY store or garden centre, grab yourself some twine and get crocheting.

We love seeing your creations and makes, so don’t forget to tag us #CraftyCoCreations

Happy crocheting

The Crafty Co

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